Journals

Viewpoint: Thoughts on internationalism and planning

Town Planning Review 89.4 features ‘Viewpoint: Thoughts on internationalism and planning’ by Ben Davy. In Town Planning Review 90.1, the first issue of 2019, Klaus Kunzmann contributed his paper ‘Viewpoint: Why not Italian? Differences matter! A comment on Ben Davy’s Viewpoint in TPR on ‘Thoughts on internationalism and planning’. Below, Ben Davy describes his paper and shares his thoughts on the subject.

Ben Davy’s paper in 89.4 will be free to read for a limited time here.

When I joined the team of Town Planning Review’s co-editors in November 2017, I had just come back from a UN Climate Change Conference where I had experienced an awkward, even embarrassing situation that made me think hard about the importance of internationalism (if you want to know more about this situation, please check my Viewpoint here). Despite my reflection, I have not been able to present a clear view on internationalism and planning. At least, Professor Klaus R. Kunzmann, my esteemed colleague from the University of Dortmund, thinks that my thoughts on internationalism and planning are »opaque«. He also assumes that differences do not matter to me, and that Mozart’s Zauberflöte best be performed in Italian. Since I prefer to listen to Emanuel Schikaneder’s original libretto (in German), I better hold my tongue on the Magic Flute.

So, what’s my view on internationalism and why it is important to planners? As I am writing this blog entry, the international community – or, at least, those parts of the international community that are still committed to internationalism – celebrate the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a textbook example of internationalism. The Universal Declaration was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in December 1948, and 70 years later, global human rights have failed many tests in the real world which is still filled with injustice, violence, humiliation, and terror. Global human rights, however, have also sharpened our perception of territorial sovereignty (as limited) and the rights of every woman, man, or child against national governments (as augmented). Both achievements are today called into question by the Universal Declaration of Human Hate constantly streamed on Twitter, Facebook, and other anti-social media. In my Viewpoint, I am emphasizing the need to learn about and understand others because learning and understanding are entrenched elements of internationalism. I am happy that Professor Kunzmann and I seem to agree on this point because he announces that »[t]o this end Ben Davy is absolutely right.«

In my Viewpoint, I take the role of internationalism as an instrument of building world peace even a bit further—by taking it back several centuries. Internationalism is a child of neither the internet nor YouTube. Roman law was codified in the 6th century A.D. with a clear conception of ius gentium, the law of all peoples. Although legal internationalism always also has been an instrument of hegemony, international law can be considered, as Martti Koskenniemi thinks, the »gentle civilizer of nations«. On a much smaller scale, but very dear to me, planning can play a similar role which is not opaque, but much needed. Planning can be the »gentle civilizer« of land users worldwide. Although land use planning is always sub-national, planners benefit from an international exchange with other planners. In fact, many associations and networks already exist and trade knowledge and ideas between planners, who are curious about what goes on in other countries and other planning systems. Among these associations are the Association of African Planning Schools (AAPS; www.africanplanningschools.org.za), the Asian Planning School Association (APSA; http://apsaweb.org/), the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning (ACSP; www.acsp.org), the Association of European Schools of Planning (AESOP; www.aesop-planning.eu) and other members of the Global Planning Education Association Network (GPEAN). Not in all, but in many discussions within these networks, English is the working language of choice. Italian or German are not. Appreciating this fact is not evidence of ignoring differences, it merely acknowledges that most congress hosts cannot afford to hire translators.

 

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Journals

Town Planning Review 90.1 Featured Article

The editors of Town Planning Review have selected “Why not Italian? Differences matter! A comment on Ben Davy’s Viewpoint in TPR on ‘Thoughts on internationalism and planning’” by Klaus R. Kunzmann as the Featured Article for 90.1.

The paper will be free to access for a limited time here.

When asked to describe the paper, and highlight its importance the author stated the following:

In his very personal essay Ben Davy, the acting president of AESOP, the Association of European Planning Schools, argues that open physical, mental and cultural borders should certainly be on the agenda of the planning community. His viewpoints on internationalisation and planning, however, remain opaque. What is internationalism in planning? Writing in English, or Globish respectively in “Audacity English” as Ben Davy calls it, certainly is not, though it may help to communicate with planners in other countries when travelling around to see other places and learn from other experiences. He is absolutely right, when he writes “internationalisation never must be an excuse for cultural appropriation, intellectual colonialism”.

In times of globalisation internationalism is a virtue of enlightened citizens (including planners) who are open and curious to learn from other cultures, from people who believe in other gods, and who have still memories of their lands of origin they had left permanently or temporally for whatever reason. Most internationally minded planners outside the Anglo-American world of planning are more international than those within the Anglo-American world, who, as a rule, pick-up developments outside only, once they are written in English.

Though one should not forget that planners, who are doing the hard work of practical planning work in their home countries, who are daily communicating with citizens, developers, politicians and powerful local stakeholders of urban development, do it in their local language. And these are 99% of the planning community. They can be internationally minded, but their assignment is to address local challenges to find solutions for local problems to ultimately to contribute to improving quality of life in the place, for which they are responsible.

In times of globalization the gap between theory and practice in planning is widening. Language that bridges academia, divides planning theory from planning practice. Planners who are bridge-builders between theory and practice are a scarce species. and those who are addressing both international and local planning communities in two languages are even more so.

While internationally recognized planning theory tends to distance itself from local practice, local practitioners are being cocooned in legislative and administrative rationales, often dominated by local party politics. Here a more international view on planning can certainly help. Young academic planners, locked in the treadmill of career promotion may not bother, whether their thoughts on planning are read by local and regional planning professionals. Their ambition is rather to earn international credits to further advance their academic careers.

Planners have to be educated to cope with the obvious gap between international theory and local practice. Basing planning education on theoretical global curricula, as it has been frequently suggested by prominent writers may make sense for post-post-doc degrees , though this is valid only for a small minority of planners. When preparing the other 99 percent planners in a country or region, it may raise the individual awareness but not really qualify for doing the job, neither in India, Italy or Afghanistan.

More bridge-builders are needed to bridge the gap between global and local as well as the gap between theory and practice in planning.. Regrettably the number of such bridge-builders is too small. English will certainly remain the only way of easy communication in business and financial worlds, and in the world of sciences, as Latin has been more than 500 years ago. In the not too distant future daily improving digital translation, however, may become a threat to English as a lingua franca. Internationalism in planning is learning from difference.

Francois Julien, the French philosopher, has reminded us that the future world is a world of in-between languages, of translations not of Globish, the globalized English.

 

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Journals

The Indexer: The International Journal of Indexing has been accepted for inclusion in Scopus

The Content Selection & Advisory Board has advised that The Indexer has been accepted for inclusion in SCOPUS, the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.

The Indexer, published by the Society of Indexers and Liverpool University Press on behalf of indexing societies worldwide, seeks to cover the full range of subjects, from articles at the cutting edge of new techniques to contributions discussing in a practical way the new tools available to indexers at all points in the technical spectrum or exploring the history of indexing.

Reviewer comments:

+ The abstracts are in keeping with Scopus English Language requirements.

+ In general, the content of the articles is consistent with the scope and aims of the journal.

+ The articles are generally well written and understandable.

+ Although the scope of this journal is narrow, it addresses the need of an important niche audience.

Longstanding title – since 1958. Double blind peer review process. Regional diversity with editorial board members as well authors.

Browse The Indexer online here, or sign up to receive TOC alerts here.

 

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Journals

LUP has partnered with Enago, providing professional language editing services for our Planning journals

Liverpool University Press is pleased to offer English editing services to LUP authors around the world in partnership with Enago, one of the world’s leading academic editing service providers. Enago’s service can help to improve the quality of manuscripts submitted to the press, especially authors for whom English is not the first language.

The service will be available to authors submitting manuscripts to our Planning journals; International Development Planning Review and Town Planning Review.
Enago helps serve the needs of the global scholarly community by providing easy access to high quality manuscript preparation services. Visit the official page: http://www.enago.com/lup to know more about the collaboration and send manuscripts for editing.

 

Enago-new-logo

 

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Journals

Journal of Romance Studies: Editor’s Choice

The Journal of Romance Studies, published in association with the Institute of Modern Languages Research, will be published by Liverpool University Press from 2017.

To celebrate, the editor has chosen a selection of some of the most notable and influential articles from the journal’s history, which Liverpool University Press is delighted to make available free of charge online for a limited time.

Please click on the article title below to download your free PDF.

‘Forgetting Africa’
Johannes Fabian
Volume 1, Issue 3, 2001

‘Acceptable hospitality: from Rousseau’s Levite to the strangers in our midst today’ 
Judith Still
Volume 3, Issue 2, 2003

‘High anxiety: Abre los ojos/Vanilla Sky’
Paul Julian Smith
Volume 4, Issue 1, 2004

‘Historical trauma and literary testimony: writing and repetition in the Buchenwald memoirs of Jorge Semprun’
Susan Rubin Suleiman
Volume 4, Issue 2, 2004

‘Women in dialogue and in solitude’
Michèle Le Doeuff
Volume 5, Issue 2, 2005

‘Psychoanalysis and the aesthetic subject’
Leo Bersani
Volume 6, Issue 3, 2006

‘Cinematic city: the Spanish avant-garde, modernity and mass culture’
Jo Labanyi
Volume 8, Issue 2, 2008

‘Antinomies of citizenship’
Étienne Balibar
Volume 10, Issue 2, 2010

‘Shifting borders’
Paulo de Medeiros
Volume 11, Issue 1, 2011

‘Representations of the Islamic community in Italy 2001–2011’
Charles Burdett
Volume 13, Issue 1, 2013