Enlightenment

Translating “rights of man” across language, time and meaning

With the release of this month’s book, The Enlightenment and rights of man, the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment is pleased to publish, for the first time in our nearly 65-year history, a translation of a previously published scholarly title. We are honored and proud that Vincenzo Ferrone, Professor of Modern History at Department … Continue reading

Enlightenment, Modern Languages

What early French female press can tell us about a key period for women in public life

This piece was originally published on The Conversation. Straddling the private and public domains, the early French women’s press – the various published journals and pamphlets that began to appear in the 18th and early 19th centuries – can provide a unique insight into women’s everyday struggles and successes during a particularly turbulent period in France’s … Continue reading

Enlightenment

John V’s Lisbon: the new Rome

Pilar Diez del Corral Corredoira is the editor of the October volume in the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series, Politics and the arts in Lisbon and Rome, a cross-disciplinary study of the Golden Age of Portugal in the eighteenth-century which explores new perspectives on John V of Portugal and his cultural endeavours with … Continue reading

Enlightenment

The phenomenon of the “amateur”

The September volume in the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series, L’amateur à l’époque des Lumières, studies the phenomenon of amateurship in several disciplines and cultural backgrounds. It aims to articulate sociological, rhetorical, and poetical perspectives, as the term "amateur" is considered to refer to a social type or role, to a discursive figure, … Continue reading

Enlightenment

Imperial Letters Don’t Burn

Kelsey Rubin-Detlev is the author of The Epistolary art of Catherine the Great, the first book to analyse Catherine the Great as an outstanding Enlightenment letter-writer, and the August volume of the Oxford University Studes in the Enlightenment series. In this blog post, she explores how Catherine cleverly used letter-writing to her advantage and to … Continue reading