Journals, Modern Languages, News, Political History, Uncategorized

Journal Archives – a comprehensive collection of leading academic research from 1934 – 2004

To celebrate the launch of the new journal archives from Liverpool University Press, we hear from several journal editors on what they like best about looking back and reflecting on past journal issues, and why it’s great news for readers seeking historical research in the fields of Modern Languages and Political History. Political History Archive … Continue reading

History

The Byzantine Romance of Livistros and Rodamne and its place in Medieval Eurasian erotic fiction

For many informed readers or simple enthusiasts the presence of erotic literature in the western or eastern medieval world (the poems of the Carmina Burana, for example, or various tales in The Thousand and One Nights) does not come as a surprise. For the most of us, however, the very existence of erotic literature in … Continue reading

History

Reading proofs in lockdown

Exodus is an exceptional Old English poem, dramatically focussing on the crossing of the Red Sea. The exodus to the Promised Land is interpreted within the allegorical perspective of the christian's journey through life to the ultimate heavenly home. In May 2020, LUP published the third edition of Peter J. Lucas's Exodus during the first wave … Continue reading

History

Better late than never: for the popes, and the translation of their letters

Earlier this month we published the first complete translation of all of ninety-nine letters that survive in a single manuscript, the Codex epistolaris Carolinus. These remarkable eighth century political documents are from popes Gregory III, Zacharias, Stephen II, Paul I, the anti-pope Constantine, Stephen III and Hadrian I to, respectively Charles Martel, Pippin III, Carloman and … Continue reading

History

Locked down with the popes: the Codex epistolaris Carolinus

My constant companions during the isolation necessitated by the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 were a group of long-dead popes. Gregory III, Zacharias, Stephen II and his brother Paul I, their luckless successor Pope Constantine II,[1] Constantine’s ruthless deposer Stephen III, and the ostensibly more urbane Hadrian I[2] ruled the see of Rome in the second … Continue reading