History

Black troops were welcome in Britain, but Jim Crow wasn’t: the race riot of one night in June 1943

This piece was originally published by The Conversation. Bullet holes found in the wood surrounds of the NatWest Bank in Bamber Bridge, in Lancashire in the north of England, in the late 1980s led to the rediscovery of an event that saw some of the few shots fired in anger in England during World War … Continue reading

History, Modern Languages, postcolonial studies

As statues fall: rethinking the blindspots of French national memory

By Etienne Achille, Charles Forsdick and Lydie Moudileno Pierre Nora’s collective volume Les Lieux de mémoire (1984-1992) has been widely recognized as one of the most important historiographical interventions of the late 20th century. Emerging initially from a context dominated by debates around how to commemorate the bicentenary of the French Revolution in 1989, the … Continue reading

History

Royal Navy sailors were appalled by conditions on slave ships, but those they ‘rescued’ rarely experienced true freedom

This piece was originally published on The Conversation.  Britain was once among the most enthusiastic of slave-trading nations. But just over 200 years ago, the country dramatically changed course and used its naval dominance against the transatlantic trade in enslaved African people, one of the worst historical crimes against humanity. After the Abolition Act of 1807 … Continue reading

History

Planning in the Early Medieval Landscape

Authors of forthcoming publication Planning in the Early Medieval Landscape, John Blair, Stephen Rippon, and Christopher Smart have shared an insight into their new work and how their book offers a completely new perspective on how villages and other settlements were formed. This collaboration between landscape archaeologists, historians and statisticians puts the early medieval landscape of … Continue reading

History

Economic Warfare and the Sea, 1650-1945

The recently published Economic Warfare and the Sea examines the relationship between trade, maritime warfare, and strategic thought between the early modern period and the late-twentieth century.  To celebrate the publication of this latest publication from our Research in Maritime History series, editors David Morgan-Owen and Louis Halewood have put together a short introduction to the … Continue reading