Literature

Keeping the Ancient Way: the Life and Work of Henry Vaughan

New to our English Association Monographs series, Keeping the Ancient Way is a detailed study of the historical contexts and literary achievements of seventeenth-century poet Henry Vaughan. In this blog post, author Robert Wilcher reflects on his study of Vaughan throughout his academic career. The publication of my book on Henry Vaughan, Keeping the Ancient … Continue reading

Literature

Reading Tagore’s ‘The Post Office’ During the Pandemic: Reflections on the Nature of Education

Modern Writers, Transnational Literatures, published by Clemson University Press, examines W.B. Yeats’s and Rabindranath Tagore’s literary engagements with identity, nationalism, and the literary and cultural traditions of Ireland and India. In this blog post, author Ragini Mohite re-visits Tagore’s The Post Office and considers the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on education and societal structures. … Continue reading

Literature

Looking for Moses from Frances Harper to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Excavating Exodus published by Clemson University Press charts Black writers’ shifting conceptions of Moses from self-sacrificing leader to authoritarian figure. In this blog post, author J. Laurence Cohen considers how Frances Harper and Martin Luther King, Jr. looked to Moses in their resistance to oppression. April has long been a decisive month in U.S. history. … Continue reading

History, Literature

Sailor Talk: Labor, Utterance, and Meaning in the Works of Melville, Conrad, and London

I was raised in a world rich with sailor talk. My father, Captain James (‘Jay’) S. Bercaw, was a masterful storyteller. My sister Katrina, brother Seán, and I cherished sitting at his feet as he told brilliant and evocative sea stories. He had sailed twice around the world as First Mate on a square-rigged vessel, … Continue reading