Film studies, Literature

The Continuing Relevance of Mr Freedom

When I wrote my book on William Klein's Mr. Freedom (1969), I was mostly interested in the way it related to the American cinematic tradition. Although I did try to show how the film arose from a broader narrative history – including literature and poetry – my focus was on how it helps us understand … Continue reading

Literature, science fiction

Sport, Religio-Politics, and Science Fiction

Enticing you to read his most recent book, Sport and Monstrosity in Science Fiction by Derek J. Thiess, gave him a unique challenge. How does he get the buy-in of, primarily, academics on a project about sport—a subject that is largely viewed, especially in the humanities, as having little to do with the serious, intellectual … Continue reading

Literature, science fiction

Apocalypse in Fiction: Then and Now

Christopher Palmer, author of Apocalypse in Crisis, explores the rise of apocalyptic fiction since the end of the Second World War, shining a light on the relevance of current crises to the genre.             One thing that the experience of the last few years has forced on us is that we are not allowed one … Continue reading

Film studies

John Frankenheimer’s Seconds (1966)

New to Auteur's Constellations series, Seconds explores John Frankenheimer's criminally overlooked monolith of paranoia, part science fiction, part body horror, part noir thriller cum black comedy. In this blog post authors Jez Conolly and Emma Westwood reflect on their study of the 1966 film. Writing a book about John Frankenheimer’s Seconds, arguably Hollywood’s bleakest ever film, was always going … Continue reading

Film studies, Journals

Science Fiction Film & Television: special issue exploring the boundaries between science fiction studies and game studies – free to read interviews

Out now Science Fiction Film & Television Volume 14.2, a special issue exploring the boundaries between science fiction studies and game studies, guest edited by Darshana Jayemanne and Cameron Kunzelman. Including interviews free to read for three months.