Journals

International Development Planning Review 41.1 Featured Article

The editors of International Development Planning Review have selected ‘Contesting socialist state visions for modern mobilities: informal motorbike taxi drivers’ struggles and strategies on Hanoi’s streets, Vietnam’ by Sarah Turner and  Ngô Thúy Hạnh as the Featured Article for IDPR 41.1.

The paper will be free to access for a limited time here.

When asked to describe the paper, and highlight its importance, Sarah Turner stated the following:

This paper came about because I had been working with street vendors in Hanoi, the capital city of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, for over a decade, and I was becoming increasingly concerned that restrictive and punitive measures being applied to these vendors by municipal officials, might be hampering the livelihoods of other informal economy workers who utilize the city’s streets as their workplace. Hanoi’s municipal authorities, with strong backing from the central government, are conceiving an urban space replete with security, orderliness, and modernity. This is resulting in rapid changes to the city’s urban form and access to infrastructure and amenities, while informal economy workers are being sidelined from official narratives of the city’s future.

And then came the city’s proposal to ban motorbikes by 2030. I immediately wondered how xe ôm drivers – informal motorbike taxi drivers – were going to cope. Moreover, I had witnessed the rapid rise in numbers of blue (UberMoto) and green (GrabBike) jacketed app-based drivers weaving through the city’s streets. My regular ‘traditional’ xe ôm driver, Hoà, often shook his head at these younger drivers’ inability to know where to go without their trusty GPS, and made rather disparaging comments about their lack of knowledge of the fastest routes…

Hence this project was born, with the aim of investigating the mobile livelihoods and everyday politics of xe ôm drivers in Hanoi. It would not have been possible without the help of Ngô Thúy Hạnh, my Hanoi-based research assistant and good friend, who goes out of her way to support my research endeavors, and those of my students, even when it means working long hours to complete our interviews alongside her regular job. Hạnh has a natural ability to put people at ease and gaining interviewees’ trust to learn about their livelihoods and concerns beyond the ‘public transcript’. Hạnh also actively introduces new questions and elements into our research endeavors. For example, she recently noticed that traditional xe ôm drivers are now buying green GrabBike jackets and helmets to mimic the new competitors. Moreover, now that GrabBike has bought out Uber and has little competition to keep prices in check, traditional xe ôm are gaining back customers. These customers are disgruntled at the price hikes GrabBike now places on evenings and weekends. As the ban inches closer, and the competition changes in nature, our research and rides continue…

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Journals

Journal of Romance Studies: Editor’s Choice

The Journal of Romance Studies, published in association with the Institute of Modern Languages Research, will be published by Liverpool University Press from 2017.

To celebrate, the editor has chosen a selection of some of the most notable and influential articles from the journal’s history, which Liverpool University Press is delighted to make available free of charge online for a limited time.

Please click on the article title below to download your free PDF.

‘Forgetting Africa’
Johannes Fabian
Volume 1, Issue 3, 2001

‘Acceptable hospitality: from Rousseau’s Levite to the strangers in our midst today’ 
Judith Still
Volume 3, Issue 2, 2003

‘High anxiety: Abre los ojos/Vanilla Sky’
Paul Julian Smith
Volume 4, Issue 1, 2004

‘Historical trauma and literary testimony: writing and repetition in the Buchenwald memoirs of Jorge Semprun’
Susan Rubin Suleiman
Volume 4, Issue 2, 2004

‘Women in dialogue and in solitude’
Michèle Le Doeuff
Volume 5, Issue 2, 2005

‘Psychoanalysis and the aesthetic subject’
Leo Bersani
Volume 6, Issue 3, 2006

‘Cinematic city: the Spanish avant-garde, modernity and mass culture’
Jo Labanyi
Volume 8, Issue 2, 2008

‘Antinomies of citizenship’
Étienne Balibar
Volume 10, Issue 2, 2010

‘Shifting borders’
Paulo de Medeiros
Volume 11, Issue 1, 2011

‘Representations of the Islamic community in Italy 2001–2011’
Charles Burdett
Volume 13, Issue 1, 2013

Journals

All LUP journal content free for Open Access Week!

Free access to all Liverpool University Press journals content during Open Access Week 2016

Liverpool University Press is the UK’s third oldest university press and one of its fastest growing publishers in the humanities and social sciences. LUP has an illustrious history of publishing exceptional research – including the work of Nobel Prize winners. Since its 2004 relaunch, LUP has expanded rapidly and now publishes around 80 books and 28 journals each year. In 2015, the Press won both The IPG Frankfurt Book Fair Academic and Professional Publisher of the Year and The Bookseller Independent Academic, Educational and Professional Publisher of the Year awards.

Content will be freely available across all subject areas, including: languages, literature, history, screen and media studies, visual culture, and planning. This varied collection ranges from over 90 years’ worth of Bulletin of Hispanic Studies to pioneering young titles such as Science Fiction Film and Television and Music, Sound and the Moving Image, and from over 100 years of Town Planning Review to its latest journals Quaker StudiesStudia Hibernica, and Journal of Romance Studies (2017).

LUP will not only be showcasing the richness and diversity of its journals publishing programme, but will also celebrate the press’ distinguished heritage with free access to its premium backfiles.

Content is available until midnight on Sunday 30th October simply by visiting http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk, with no further setup required.

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