Journals

The Indexer: The International Journal of Indexing has been accepted for inclusion in Scopus

The Content Selection & Advisory Board has advised that The Indexer has been accepted for inclusion in SCOPUS, the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.

The Indexer, published by the Society of Indexers and Liverpool University Press on behalf of indexing societies worldwide, seeks to cover the full range of subjects, from articles at the cutting edge of new techniques to contributions discussing in a practical way the new tools available to indexers at all points in the technical spectrum or exploring the history of indexing.

Reviewer comments:

+ The abstracts are in keeping with Scopus English Language requirements.

+ In general, the content of the articles is consistent with the scope and aims of the journal.

+ The articles are generally well written and understandable.

+ Although the scope of this journal is narrow, it addresses the need of an important niche audience.

Longstanding title – since 1958. Double blind peer review process. Regional diversity with editorial board members as well authors.

Browse The Indexer online here, or sign up to receive TOC alerts here.

 

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Journals

LUP has partnered with Enago, providing professional language editing services for our Planning journals

Liverpool University Press is pleased to offer English editing services to LUP authors around the world in partnership with Enago, one of the world’s leading academic editing service providers. Enago’s service can help to improve the quality of manuscripts submitted to the press, especially authors for whom English is not the first language.

The service will be available to authors submitting manuscripts to our Planning journals; International Development Planning Review and Town Planning Review.
Enago helps serve the needs of the global scholarly community by providing easy access to high quality manuscript preparation services. Visit the official page: http://www.enago.com/lup to know more about the collaboration and send manuscripts for editing.

 

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Journals

Hunter Gather Research has been accepted for inclusion in Scopus

The Content Selection & Advisory Board (CSAB), has advised that Hunter Gatherer Research has been accepted for inclusion in Scopus, the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature.

The reviewer comments are copied below:

  • The journal consistently includes articles that are scientifically sound and relevant to an international academic or professional audience in this field.
  • The journal has scholarly relevance as evidenced by citations in other journals currently covered by Scopus.
  • In general, the content of the articles is consistent with the scope and aims of the journal.
  • The articles are consistently of high academic quality, consistent with the journal’s stated aims.
  • Although the scope of this journal is narrow, it addresses the need of an important niche audience.

Hunter Gatherer Research is an international, multi-disciplinary quarterly publication that covers all aspects of hunter-gatherer studies, whether focusing on the present, past or future. It encompasses genetics, ecology, evolutionary anthropology, archaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory, linguistics, indigenous rights and applied research.

Browse Hunter Gatherer Research >

Journals

Town Planning Review 89.6 Featured Article

The editors of Town Planning Review have selected ‘Civic-led public space: favourable conditions for the management of community gardens’ by Anne Könst, Rianne van Melik, and Wouter-Jan Verheul.

It will be free to access for a limited time here.

When asked to describe the paper, and highlight its importance the authors stated the following:

In our paper, we investigate five community gardens in the Netherlands, which are all developed and managed by members of the community, in most cases close neighbours. We wanted to find out why and how these citizens became engaged in the (co)production of public space. In our current ‘Big Society’, citizen participation is seen as a favourable development. When citizens manage public space, this potentially alleviates pressure on municipal budgets and leads to increased use. However, there are also potential downsides, such as exclusion of people who feel the garden is not ‘for them’.

Our research has shown that favourable conditions for the management of community gardens alter over time. Setting up a community garden is one thing, but formally managing it on the long run is another. A sense of urgency, visionary and connective leadership, a large external network and government support are essential when starting a community initiative. However, in the management phase, personal interest, ‘fun’, shared responsibilities and a local network become important conditions. Community gardens thus need to be adaptive to respond to changing circumstances as the initiative matures.

Civic-led public space like our investigated community gardens have their pros and cons. In each case, a green space was added to neighbourhoods with limited public space. As such, the gardens served a broader societal purpose and not just personal interests. However, we have also seen that civic leadership makes these initiatives relatively vulnerable. The gardens heavily rely on older and often unemployed or retired volunteers; other volunteers are difficult to recruit. Managing public space is time-consuming and can undermine the primary activities of gardening and socialising. Moreover, there is a tension between being sufficiently ‘closed’ to ensure volunteers feel connected to the gardens and not being ‘open’ enough to other residents in the neighbourhood.

Overall, our research revealed that there is a large variety in the ways community gardens are organised and who is involved. Even when public spaces are managed by citizens, they still often collaborate with many other actors, including local governments, supermarkets, day-care centres, etc. The paper thus highlights that there is no single actor who can best manage public space; local governments, markets and communities are mutually dependent in creating attractive public space, each having their own strengths and weaknesses.

The authors also commented:

Könst: “During the interviews the degree of resilience proved to be an important characteristic of successfully managed community gardens, which is an important base for sustainable urban development.”

Van Melik: “Community gardens are very interesting examples of public spaces in which citizens play a very active and autonomous role. This makes them perfect sites to study the pros and cons of co-producing public space.”

Verheul: “We feel that public-space literature is dominated by the dichotomy of public versus private, where government-led public space is generally preferred over market-led. The debate would profit from a trichotomous perspective in acknowledging that public space is increasingly a co-production of state, market and as our empirical study shows: community. They all have their strengths and weaknesses, are mutually dependent, and should not be considered as a replacement, but as an addition to each other.”

Journals

Town Planning Review 89.5 Featured Article

The editors of Town Planning Review have selected ‘Mass Transit Railway, transit-oriented development and spatial justice: the competition for prime residential locations in Hong Kong since the 1980s‘ by Sylvia Y. He, Sui Tao, Yuting Hou and Wenhua Jiang as the Featured Article for the latest issue.

It will be free to access for a limited time here.

When asked to describe the paper, and highlight its importance, Sylvia Y. He, Sui Tao, Yuting Hou and Wenhua Jiang stated the following:

Mass Transit Railway, transit-oriented development and spatial justice: the competition for prime residential locations in Hong Kong since the 1980s

In our paper, we examine the issues of spatial justice and right to the city in a particular urban development model in Hong Kong, a city known for it public transport system – particularly the Mass Transit Railway (MTR).

During a visit to the City Gallery in Hong Kong, an officer in the Planning Department of Hong Kong proudly stated that a reasonable amount of land near the MTR has always been reserved for public housing estate development, which will likely to benefit the low-income groups. On the other hand, some local residents have been complaining that the prime land around MTR stations has become less and less affordable as they are increasingly developed by private developers. These two conflicting views from different stakeholders prompted us to wonder whether transit-oriented development (TOD) is as euphoric as it may sound. Hence we are intrigued to investigate three related questions in this essay:
– Are Hong Kong’s public housing estates located in less desirable locations in relation to the MTR network?
– What is the impact of MTR network on accessibility over time?
– Whether the locations of private and public housing estates have changed as a result of MTR network expansion?

The situation of housing market in Hong Kong offers an ideal laboratory to examine the residential location choice of two distinctive income groups. Like in many other cities, the public housing estates are mainly reserved for the low income groups. In contrast to many cities, about 47% of the population live in public housing in Hong Kong compared to 51% in private housing, making these two types of housing estates a representative analysis unit to trace the residential location of the low-income group and the non-low-income group.

Based on the findings, our study sheds some light on the current urban development practice in Hong Kong: the low-income group is facing the challenge of being priced out from the locations with easier access to public transport. This study can potentially serve as a reference for other cities that are or aim to become TOD cities.