Literature, Modern Languages

An interview with Maria Kathryn Tomlinson, author of ‘From Menstruation to the Menopause’

To celebrate the publication and upcoming book launch of her new book, Dr. Tomlinson was interviewed by fellow LUP author, Dr. Wimbush to discuss the novel and the ways in which it handles representations of menstruation, childbirth and the menopause in women's writing in French.

Modern Languages

Transnational French Studies: it’s not all baguettes and berets

By Charles Forsdick and Claire Launchbury As a site of arrival, transit and departure, the airport epitomizes the transnational. Exemplary in this regard is France’s largest international airport, Paris-Charles-de-Gaulle. Opened in 1974, by taking the name of the recently deceased de Gaulle, it sought to project French exceptionalism, a renewed national self-confidence in the aftermath … Continue reading

History, Modern Languages, postcolonial studies

As statues fall: rethinking the blindspots of French national memory

By Etienne Achille, Charles Forsdick and Lydie Moudileno Pierre Nora’s collective volume Les Lieux de mémoire (1984-1992) has been widely recognized as one of the most important historiographical interventions of the late 20th century. Emerging initially from a context dominated by debates around how to commemorate the bicentenary of the French Revolution in 1989, the … Continue reading

Enlightenment, Modern Languages

What early French female press can tell us about a key period for women in public life

This piece was originally published on The Conversation. Straddling the private and public domains, the early French women’s press – the various published journals and pamphlets that began to appear in the 18th and early 19th centuries – can provide a unique insight into women’s everyday struggles and successes during a particularly turbulent period in France’s … Continue reading

Modern Languages

‘Rin-Tin-Tin and the Cancan’

In his new book, Montmartre: A Cultural History, Nicholas Hewitt delves into the history of the neighbourhood to discover how the bohemian cultural hub pioneered the new the avant-garde in painting, theatre and literature. ‘What is Montmartre? Nothing. What must it be? Everything’, proclaimed Rodolphe Salis in 1881, when his cabaret Le Chat Noir launched an … Continue reading