Enlightenment

What’s Blood Got to Do With It? Reimagining Kinship in the Age of Enlightenment

Tracy Rutler is the author of Queering the Enlightenment: Kinship and gender in eighteenth-century French literature, the November volume in the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series. This new work analyzes French literature from the 1730s and 40s to illuminate the potential of queer forms of kinship to dismantle the patriarchy and to help us imagine what might … Continue reading

History, Literature, postcolonial studies

Sex, Sea and Self: Jacqueline Couti talks to Katharine Shilcutt for Rice University

This article explores the 'Sex, Sea and Self''s ideas in further depth, examining Couti's thoughts on selfhood, French Caribbean literature and the sexualisation of black female bodies.

Literature, Modern Languages, Political History, postcolonial studies

Female Francophone Aesthetics of Exile: In discussion with Antonia Wimbush

Author Antonia Wimbush offers an insight into issues of belonging, geographical mobility and the self in contemporary autofictional literature.

Enlightenment

The Literary and Scientific Stakes of Transgender in Eighteenth-Century Italy and England: The Case of Catterina Vizzani

Clorinda Donato is the author of the October volume in the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series, The Life and legend of Catterina Vizzani: sexual identity, science and Sensationalism in eighteenth-century Italy and England. In this new volume, Clorinda Donato analyses the medical, societal, and narrative transcultural stakes in the life story of the transgendered Catterina Vizzani, … Continue reading

Irish Studies, Uncategorized

Women of the Country House in Ireland – Five minutes with Maeve O’Riordan

Ahead of the launch of Women of the Country House in Ireland, 1860-1914, author Maeve O'Riordan discusses the various experiences of women among the Irish Ascendancy, from financial freedom to their own observations of motherhood. Women of the Country House in Ireland 1860-1914 reveals the lives of the women among the Irish Ascendancy. How did you go about … Continue reading