Irish Studies

The Voice of the Provinces

Christopher Doughan is the author of The Voice of the Provinces, one of the first books examining the history of Ireland’s regional newspapers. Ireland’s regional and provincial newspapers have played a largely unrecognised role in Irish history: this book charts their experiences in the dramatic and sometimes violent years leading up to independence. In this … Continue reading

Irish Studies

A Parnellite in the Free State? Henry Harrison and the legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party

The Legacy of the Irish Parliamentary Party in Independent Ireland, 1922-1949 by Martin O'Donoghue offers a new perspective on the early years of independent Ireland. Providing statistical analysis of the extent of Irish Party heritage in each Dáil and Seanad in the period, it analyses how party followers reacted to independence and examines the place … Continue reading

Enlightenment

John V’s Lisbon: the new Rome

Pilar Diez del Corral Corredoira is the editor of the October volume in the Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment series, Politics and the arts in Lisbon and Rome, a cross-disciplinary study of the Golden Age of Portugal in the eighteenth-century which explores new perspectives on John V of Portugal and his cultural endeavours with … Continue reading

Journals, News

Liverpool University Press announces new partnership with ScienceOpen

Liverpool University Press is delighted to announce its newest partnership with ScienceOpen, a freely accessible search and discovery platform that puts research in context. The partnership integrates new collections in humanities, social and life sciences. Placed in an interactive discovery environment on ScienceOpen, LUP will benefit from a complete infrastructure for preprints, open and closed … Continue reading

History

Nick Mansfield on the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre

2019 marks the 200th anniversary of the Peterloo Massacre, when pro-democracy campaigners were violently dispersed by soldiers, with 18 dead and many hundreds injured. The name 'Peterloo' was adopted by critics of the attack, as a deliberate and ironic comparison with Wellington's glorious victory over Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo in 1815. This key … Continue reading